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BBB ~ English Muffins

Holidays … a full house … chaos … something special … make ahead … fun … hassle free … simple but brilliant … food … wait did you say food, as in feed this full house with chaos full strength and make it special.  And you expect to make it ahead, have it be fun, hassle free and brilliant. 
You are living in an alternate universe and not in this one.
No, truly, our Kitchen of the Month, Pat – Feeding My Enthusiasms, at least has a part of breakfast for us.  Even if you don’t have a crowd you can so two small batches over 2 days and have fresh homemade English muffins to be extravagant with honey, butter, maple syrup and jam … maybe even a peanut butter and cream cheese in the afternoon.
You may ask, why corn meal?  Over the years I’ve seen English muffins with corn meal on the bottoms and I’ve seen semolina.  Is one better than the other or more authentic?  A quick internet search I did this morning, didn’t turn up a consensus.  The function of either is to prevent sticking to the pan, griddle or spatula and lend a crispness to the crust and bottom.  I can’t help thinking it may also be to pull some moisture out of the dough while they rise, seems logical that would result.  In different locations corn meal may be more readily available and cheaper than semolina and would so be more likely to be used.  Either will serve the same function and work well.
The only tricky part of these is getting them reasonably done without burning the bottom.  Elizabeth solved that for me because my copy of Rose Levy Beranbaum, Quick Breads, Little Quick Breads, Little Yeast Breads, and Batter Breads, The Bread Bible, p170 is still packed away and I wasn’t bright enough on my own to consider sticking my thermometer  into the center of one of these to see were it was.  Try for 190°.  Elizabeth finished her’s in the oven which I think I’ll try when I finish my remaining six this afternoon but it maybe just turning the griddle down and cooking longer would work as well.

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Recipe from: Pat “Feeding My Enthusiasms”  From:  SeriousEats

English Muffins
Yield: 12 – I got 11

245 grams bread flour
40 grams rye flour (originally this 40 grams was bread flour)
140 grams whole wheat flour
11  grams table salt or (11 grams kosher or 2 3/4 teaspoons)
4 grams instant dry yeast 1 1/4 teaspoons
340 grams ounces cold milk
100 grams honey, I used only 55 grams
1 large egg white, cold
fine cornmeal to cover muffins on two sheet pans with space around them – Elle), don’t skip this
bacon or butter or oil, for griddling

Make the Dough and Let Rise: 
In a large bowl, mix bread flour, whole wheat flour, kosher salt, and yeast together until well combined.
Add milk, honey, and egg white, stirring until smooth, about 5 minutes.
Cover with plastic and set aside until spongy, light, and more than doubled, 4 to 5 hours at 70°F.

For the Second Rise:  Thickly cover a rimmed aluminum baking sheet with an even layer of cornmeal.
With a large spoon, dollop out twelve 2 2/3-ounce (75g) portions of dough I only got 11 muffins none weighed more than 78 grams or less than 72 grams; it’s perfectly fine to do this by eye.
If you’d like, pinch the irregular blobs here and there to tidy their shape.  My dough was to sticky to do much shaping, I went with what fell on the pan.  They all came out looking like … English muffins
Sprinkle with additional cornmeal, cover with plastic, and refrigerate at least 12 and up to 42 hours.

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Rising on the griddle! Oolala!

To Griddle and Serve:  Preheat an electric griddle to 325°F or warm a 12-inch cast iron skillet or griddle over medium-low heat. When sizzling-hot, add half the butter and melt; griddle muffins until their bottoms are golden brown, about 8 minutes. Flip with a square-end spatula and griddle as before. Transfer to a wire rack until cool enough to handle, then split the muffins by working your thumbs around the edges to pull them open a little at a time. Toast before serving and store leftovers in an airtight container up to 1 week at room temperature (or 1 month in the fridge).

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Special Equipment:  Flexible spatula,  rimmed baking sheet, griddle (electric or cast iron) or 12-inch cast iron skillet, square-end spatula, wire rack

Seriously easy.  Oh and that photo reminds me: homemade slow cooker apple butter is an absolute winner on these too!

Go for it why don’t you. Bake with us. Check out Pat, FeedingMyEnthusiasms for all the scoop and be a Bread Baking Buddy.  Don’t forget all the other Babes, we all had different experiences.

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BBB ~ Pumpkin Cornmeal Bread

Judy from Gross Eats is our Kitchen of the Month for October.  This was a most interesting bake!

I was excited to try this one because 1.) I have baked many of Beth Hensperger’s recipes from this book and her other books and always enjoyed them, 2.) the seasonal timing appealed and 3.) because of the ingredient combo.
I was delighted to try something pumpkin right now and I really liked the rye and cornmeal combo.
Of course I added that little bit of flax. I also had a large bag of pepitas on the counter and they seemed super appropriate. Of course pumpkin just pretty much begged for cinnamon in my book. I used a combo of flours replacing the original bread or all purpose flour.

The dough was silky and lovely to knead.
If I weren’t already in the process of perfecting another recipe (for a rye) bread, I would take this one on because it has so much promise but ultimately both Gorn & I were slightly disappointed with this bake.  We enjoyed the texture and the crust on this loaf but even using terrific flavor ingredients (strong molasses, great flour, cinnamon, pumpkin) we both of us failed to get much flavor from a slice.  We both agreed a slice has a lovely pumpkin aroma.  We just didn’t get it on the tongue.
I would recommend using more pumpkin (reduce or even entirely replace the water) and going with more cinnamon and/or pumpkin pie spice.

I did half the recipe and baked in a smaller pullman pan without the lid.

Recipe From  Judy(Gross Eats)  adapted from Bread for All Seasons by Beth Hensperger

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Pumpkin Cornmeal Bread

HALF RECIPE what I baked
1 ½ teaspoons active dry yeast
123 grams warm water (105˚ to 115˚)
124 grams warm buttermilk (105˚ to 115˚)
40 grams melted butter or oil
50 grams light molasses
1/4 cup pumpkin purée (either canned or homemade)
1 teaspoon salt
100 grams fine- or medium-grind yellow cornmeal
130 grams medium rye flour
124 grams Hovis flour, because I had it
130 grams sprouted wheat flour
140 grams white whole wheat flour
20 grams flax meal

1. In a large bowl, combine yeast, ground flax, salt, cornmeal, and rye flour.   Whisk to mix well.

Add warm water, buttermilk, melted butter/oil, molasses, and pumpkin purée. Beat until smooth (1 to 2 minutes) using either a whisk or the paddle attachment on a mixer.

Add the unbleached all-purpose flour or bread flour, ½ cup at a time, until it becomes a soft dough. Knead until smooth and slightly tacky, either by hand or with a dough hook.

2. Place in a greased bowl, turning once to coat the top; cover with plastic wrap. Let rise at room temperature until double, about 1 ½ to 2 hours, depending on how warm it is.

3. Turn onto work surface and divide the dough into 2 or 3 equal round portions. Place on parchment-lined baking pan, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise at room temperature until doubled, about 45 minutes.

4. To make dinner rolls, divide the dough into 24 equal portions and shape as desired.

Place on parchment-lined baking pan, cover loosely with plastic wrap, and let rise at room temperature until doubled, about 20 minutes, or place in refrigerator for 2 hours to overnight.

Twenty minutes before baking, heat the oven to 375˚, using a baking stone, if you wish. While the oven is heating, brush the tops with melted butter.

Bake in the center of the preheated oven until golden brown: 40-45 minutes for loaves or 15 to 18 minutes for rolls. Remove from oven, let cool on rack until completely cool.

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Since this was all whole grain, I baked this at 370° F (convection) for 50 minutes at which point it registered 199°F internal temperature.  It was baked through and not raw as can easily happen with all whole grains when I don’t check temperature of the bread.

Here’s hoping you’re all in the mood for some fall baking, and you give this delicious bread a try.  If you do decide to be a Buddy, please send your baking story and photos to Judy at jahunt22 dot gmail dot com by October 29th, and they will be included in the Buddy Roundup.

PS: Well now we’ve enjoyed this as our afternoon treat with apple butter!  Somehow that brings out the pumpkin in the bread for me.

 


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Swiss Rye Ring/Brasciadela/Kantonsbrot Graubünden ~ BBB

Cathy, Bread Experience, is our Kitchen of the Month and she has brought us a wonderful rye bread!

Cathy was super lucky to attend a conference and take a workshop with Stanley Ginsberg  http://theryebaker.com/swiss-rye-ring/#more-335  !  I’ve had his book, the Rye Baker, for quite some time and just drool over the cover.  Westphalian Pumpernickel.  I think I’ve had this or something very close in Austria once and was instantly in love.  What stops me from making this one … my stand mixer packed away in some box unidentifiable for the last 5 years.  Basically I refuse to unpack anything more for the kitchen until I have cabinets.  Cabinets maybe in the making this winter and would go in in the early Spring next year IF my latest cabinet maker comes through for me soon.  The clutter now is just too much, anything more would put me over the edge.

I’ve had plenty of success mixing by hand with recipes that “require” the stand mixer but none required kneading after pouring boiling water over flour. Sometimes I toy with getting some large rubber gloves and putting them on over 2 or 3 pairs of cotton gloves but so far I haven’t made that jump.

Straight off I’ll tell you Gorn & I are both Rye lovers. Here, I am always on the look out for the dark dense rye’s. When we’ve traveled in Europe, I always seek out the darkest ryes that I can find. Always flavorful and able to stand up to flavorful meats and cheeses, the tight crumb of rye breads makes them perfect for just about anything you can put between two slices.

This Swiss Rye Ring is a tight crumb with a mild flavor that we’re going through very quickly. This recipe bakes into a glorious loaf that even without the traditional caraway seeds, shines with the true spicy rye flavor. The first ring loaf was gone in a day and a half. The second ring loaf I fear will be gone today. The only thing wrong that I found with this bread was I was unable to find any smoked salmon to serve with it. I feel cheated while enjoying every bite of this wonderful rye. Thanks for this one Cathy.

Swiss Rye Ring/Brasciadela/Kantonsbrot Graubünden
Recipe From: Cathy (breadexperience) and adapted from Stanley Ginsberg
Yield: 2 rings 1 1/4 lb. each (575 grams)
Rye Sponge:
300 grams Medium rye flour (used pumpernickel)
200  grams Warm (105°F/41°C) water
20 grams Rye sour culture (see below)
Wheat Poolish:
200 grams First clear flour (used half whole wheal + half bread flour)
200 grams Cold water
8 grams Instant yeast
Final Dough:
520 grams Rye sponge
408 grams Wheat poolish
110 Medium rye flour (used pumpernickel)
210 grams White rye flour (used rye flour)
82 grams First clear flour (used half whole wheal + half bread flour)
170 grams Warm (105°F/41°C) water
20 grams Salt
Rye Starter/Culture ~ Day One
70 grams Organic whole grain Rye Flour
70  grams Warm water
Day Two – Seven
70 grams Culture from preceding day
70  grams Organic whole grain Rye Flour
70 grams Warm Water

1. Rye Sponge Combine the sponge ingredients by hand into a stiff dough, cover and ferment at room temperature (70°F/21°C) until doubled in volume 10-12 hours or overnight.
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2. Wheat Poolish Mix the poolish ingredients by hand, cover and refrigerate 10-12 hours or overnight.

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3. Final Dough In the mixer, combine the final dough ingredients and use the dough hook at low (KA2) speed to mix into a stiff, slightly sticky dough that leaves the sides of the bowl and gathers around the hook, 6-8 minutes. This is one of those recipes that says use a stand mixer and I did not.  I think it worked perfectly without the mixer by hand.

Cover the dough and bulk ferment at room temperature until doubled in volume, 60-75 minutes.
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4. Turn the dough onto a lightly floured work surface and divide it into two pieces weighing about 26 oz./750 g each. Form each piece into an oblong about 18 inches/45 cm long and 2 inches/5 cm in diameter. Shape each into a ring, wetting the ends to seal, and place on a well-floured peel, if using a baking stone, or parchment-lined sheet pan.

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5. Cover and proof at room temperature until the breads have visibly expanded and surface shows cracks or broken bubbles.

6. Preheat the oven to 480°F/250°C with the baking surface in the middle and a steam pan on a lower shelf. Dock the surface of each loaf thoroughly and evenly to a depth of at least ¼”/0.6 cm. with a fork, chopstick or docking wheel.

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7. Bake with steam 15 minutes, then remove the steam pan, reduce the temperature to 410°F/210°C and bake until the loaves thump when tapped with a finger and the internal temperature is at least 198°F/92°C, about 30 minutes. Transfer to a rack and cool thoroughly before slicing.

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8. RYE STARTER Mix the equal amounts (by weight) of organic rye flour and water.
Cover.
Allow to stand 24 hours at room temperature.
Dad Two – Seven:
Keep 70 grams of previous day’s culture and mix with equal amounts (by weight) of organic rye flour and water.

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Cathy is the host kitchen this month.  We’d love for you to join us. All you need to do is bake this bread and send an email to breadexperience at gmaildotcom and Cathy send you a Buddy badge.  If you don’t have a blog, no worries, just take a photo and post it to the BBBs Facebook group.  We look forward to seeing your lovely breads.

It is a very memorable delicious rye bread!


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Tootmaniks Gotovo Testo ~ BBB ~ Bake Me!

 


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Late to the Party ~ Asparagus Salmon

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We found this extraordinarily impressive.

Asparagus Salmon

Recipe By: Michel Richard
Serving Size: 4

CUT BEFORE BAKING otherwise the cuts flake the fish and it looks ragged.
I cut the salmon from the end,  laid the salmon on one half and then folded it over.  Directions below describe a much more complicated process.  I think if i had a knife with double shape edges, the tunnel idea would be easy to execute.  Short of that, I’ll try either a boneing knife or a fish knife and try for a tunnel.
We really enjoyed this.  Without the asparagus stuffed, this is just ordinary excellent salmon.  Stuffed it is ordinary excellent salmon with WOW presentation.  Well worth the minimal effort if you knead or just desire WOW.

This is the first I’ve heard of Michel Richard who died in 2016.  Thomas Keller wrote the forward for this book.  Keller has tremendous praise for Michel Richard, so much so that I’m very sorry I didn’t come on to him much sooner.  The book is full of doable recipes that are WOW presentations, it also has many recipes that I would never attempt. But I love the book and would rate it 5 starts.

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* FOR THE VINAIGRETTE
* 4 asparagus spears, peeled, trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces
* 1/4 cup water
* 2 to 4 tablespoons olive oil, plus additional to brush the salmon
* 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
* Juice of 1/2 lemon
* Pinch sugar
* Salt
* FOR THE SALMON
* 20 (24 ounces) equally sized asparagus spears, peeled
* 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped tarragon
* Salt
* Freshly ground black pepper
* 1 (20 ounces) 8- to 9-inch-long skinless salmon fillet, preferably center-cut, pin bones removed

Directions:

1. For the vinaigrette: Combine the asparagus pieces, water and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil in a small saucepan. Cook over medium heat until the asparagus is tender, about 10 minutes. Let cool; transfer the mixture to a blender and puree until smooth. Place in a bowl and add the mustard, lemon juice, sugar and the remaining olive oil. Season lightly with salt. Whisk until emulsified.

2. For the salmon: Have a large bowl of ice water ready.
I microwaved the asparagus for 3 minutes with 1/2 teaspoon olive oil.  When it is ready,  place it in the ice water to stop the cooking.
When cooled, remove from the ice water and lay the asparagus on a long piece of heavy plastic wrap. Sprinkle with the chopped tarragon, then season lightly with salt and pepper, rolling the spears to coat evenly with the seasonings.
If you make a tunnel through the salmon:  Bundle the spears so that half their tips point one way and half the other, and encase the asparagus in the wrap. Tie one end of the bundle with kitchen twine, and tether it to a table knife along its length.

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3. Place the fillet on a work surface and use a long, thin knife to cut a center pocket through to the other cut side. Work slowly and carefully. Essentially, you are cutting a tunnel through the length of the fillet, leaving at least a 1/2-inch wall uncut on each side.

4. Using the tethered table knife as a guide, carefully pull the asparagus bundle through the pocket. Unwind the ends of the plastic, slide the wrap from around the asparagus and discard. The salmon should now look like a stuffed log. Place it on a plate, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate until ready to cook.

5. Carefully cut the stuffed salmon log into four equal cross-sectioned pieces. If the log pieces are not tight, tie each one around the circumference with kitchen twine to hold it together. (Be sure to remove the twine after the fish is grilled.) Brush each piece with olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.

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6. Bake the salmon 30 minutes at 400°.

7. Spoon some of the vinaigrette on the center of each plate. Using a wide spatula, carefully transfer the salmon pieces to individual serving plates. Serve with the remaining vinaigrette on the side.


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BBB ~ Velvety Bean Bread

I don’t know about you but every once in a while I get smug and think “I’ve really baked a lot of breads.  No ALL breads but maybe I’m getting where I’m really comfortable I’ve got really good exposure to most things bread … but then there’s always another month and another Babe coming up with something just a little different.  This month it’sKelly (Hobby Baker) from A Messy Kitchen.

Always bake the original recipe before changing any thing … right?  And when have I ever done that …
So, I created an over nite soaker.
I considered the pros and cons of replacing bean liquid for water. In the end I tasted the bean water and rejected adding it because it had too strong a bean flavor.  Nothing wrong with bean flavor but it seemed wrong for bread.
Always I added flax.
I used all of the yeast because I only used whole grains.
My major failing was knowing this was whole grain and not having a thermometer.  In my Dad’s old house, I’m working with an oven that is over 45 years old, badly mistreated and scheduled for replacement on our next visit.  Between the oven and no thermometer, I way underbred these two small loaves.  The rye flavor was awesome but we could only enjoy a slice toasted so that it finished cooking. 
If you can forgive my excuses, this is a treat of a bread with the rye flour.  While the taste of this bread does not make one think “health food mediocre”, I have to think this is a super nutritious bread using the beans! 

Kelly (Hobby Baker) from A Messy Kitchen found this recipe in Home Baking: The Artful Mix of Flour and Tradition around the World
Yield: 2 small loaves

OVER NITE SOAKER
330 grams water (1.5 cup)
120 grams sprouted spelt flour
DOUGH
all of the soaker
2 cups drained cooked navy beans, room temp.
30 grams flax meal
120 grams sprouted rye flour
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 teaspoons salt
2 tablespoons caraway
130 grams white whole wheat flour
130  grams bread flour

1.  Mix water and flour in soaker and cover several hours or overnight.

2.  Process beans until smooth, transfer to a large bowl or stand mixer.

Add the sprouted flour and yeast and stir for one minute, in one direction, to develop the dough.
Add the oil, salt, and seasoning herb or spice, if using and stir them in.
Add 1 cup of the white whole wheat flour and stir in.
Add the remaining flour and knead in with a dough hook, or work in and knead by hand for about 5 minutes, until smooth.

3.  Place dough in a bowl, cover, and let rise for 3 hours, until almost doubled in volume. (There should be about 2.5 pounds of dough.)

4.  Turn out dough and divide in half. Butter two 8×4″ pans.
Form each portion of dough into a loaf and place seam side down in the pans.
Rolled each loaf in caraway seeds.
The directions say to let rise for 2½ hours. That was too long for my kitchen. The above loaf was baked after 1 hour 45 minutes. You’ll have to watch the dough for proper rise. Check at 1 hour and continue to proof if needed.

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5.  Preheat oven to 400ºF, have a spray bottle or small cup of water ready for steam. Slash each loaf lengthwise , place in oven and bake for 5 minutes, adding steam every couple minutes with the sprayer or cup.

Bake for 15 minutes, then reduce heat to 375ºF and bake for 25 minutes until rich brown with a matte finish.

Turn the loaves out and check for doneness. Finish cooling on a wire rack before slicing.

Here’s a great little article on the different white beans:
4 Types of White Beans: What’s the Difference?

The side note on this experience, very generic as it is and will be true of all dough I mix/knead in future: I bought a pastry non-stick mat.  If you want to save money or spend nothing more on kitchen/baking, skip this nest two paragraphs.  What you may ask is a non-stick pastry mat and why would I lay out any $$ for that.  Even though it’s very recently something prompted me to look these up, now I don’t remember what it was.  The first couple I found were super $$$ and I was losing interest rapidly.  Then I found one I think for under $30 and read the reviews.  It was the reviews that really sold me. 

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Now my review might sell you so you get a 2nd chance to stop reading here if you don’t want to get interested.  Always when I knead, mix or roll out anything on my counter, I clean it … and then I have to clean it again when finished.  Sometimes dough really leaves a funky residue to clean off and it can get tedious.  NOTHING sticks to the pastry mat AND it doesn’t slide.  Clean up is super simple.  When I roll it out, I know I left it clean!  The mat comes marked clearly with all sorts of measurements all over – along the edges and all those circles for rolling pie crust in the center.  Dream come true.  Yep, you want one now.
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I won’t say you have to or that you knead to run out and get a pastry non-stick mat but I would encourage you to bake the Velvety Bean Bread and make it with rye … assuming you enjoy rye.  I’m sure you have a better oven than I and you’re in your own kitchen with a thermometer. 

Join the Bread Baking Babes and bake up a unique little loaf that is high in protein but a little lower in gluten than normal.  This is a lovely little bread and we would love for you to bake along with us!  Just bake your version of this bread by July 30th and send Kelly a note with your results and a picture or link to your post at eleyana(AT)aol(DOT)com with Buddy Bread in the subject line and she will include you in our buddy round up at the beginning of next month and send you a Buddy badge graphic to keep and/or add to your post.  You don’t have to have a blog to participate, a picture is fine!


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Kaak Bread ~ BBB ~ Lebanese Street Bread

Our hostess this month, Kitchen of the Month: Karen of BakeMyDay.  She being a very fashion conscious woman has brought us a new hand bag … as in the kind you fill with your hearts desire of goodness and yum it … that means eat it up.
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This is Lebanese street food.  Simple and tasty.
As I understand it a vendor will create a pocket and the bread is filled on the spot with your choice of different fillings.  I did several of mine with za’atar mixed in labneh.  Very good.

And dull as it may seem I also did my favorite with an olive oil fried egg.

235 grams buttermilk, 2 1/2 cups total water + buttermilk
245 grams water
2 tablespoons olive oil
1.5 tablespoons sugar
2 teaspoons salt
1 tablespoon instant dry yeast
135 gr whole wheat flour **, used 3 cups flour total
490 gr all purpose flour, you may need a little more, but don’t add too much flour **
1 egg for egg wash
1-2 tablespoon sesame seeds per kaak
You will also need lined baking sheets

Directions:

1. The night before baking, I mixed 1 cup white whole wheat with all the liquid and placed in the refrigerator.

2. Allowed the over night mix to warm for an hour before mixing in the yeast, sugar, salt and oil.
I mixed 1 1/4 cup white whole wheat and 3/4 cup bread flour into the overnight mix.
Fairly straight forward dough kneading…
This dough will need a normal rise until doubled. What you’ll be looking for is a malleable non-sticky dough.

3. Shaping; divide dough in equal parts (aim for 100 gram each) and ball up. Cover and let rest to relax for about 15 minutes.

I rolled the dough ball into a log.

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4. Then I rolled the ends of the dough ball into ropes and tapered them at the ends.

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5. Raised the ends and pinched together. Flattened the bottom of the purse.

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6. Place the shaped breads on lined baking sheets, be careful not to stretch the dough.
Loosely cover to rise another 25-30 minutes.

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Egg wash the breads, sprinkle with sesame seeds. Bake for 12-15 minutes (all whole wheat takes longer) or until golden and puffed in a pre-heated oven 400° F (200-220°C).
I think they will benefit from a bit of steam in your oven. Use your preferred method; either ice cubes, boiling water in a heated pan… bake on a stone…
No stone in this kitchen, baked mine on sheet pan.

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This was very easy to work into my schedule, very easy to shape … and fun to shape, and very easy to enjoy.
You know you need a new purse, so get out the flour and start mixing!
Be a Buddy and bake with us!  Karen gives you directions on her blog to bake with us and be a Buddy … and you get great rolls and a new bread to discover.
I super enjoyed these with the za’atar mixed in labneh.