MyKitchenInHalfCups

Once Upon a time: Cooking … Baking … Traveling … Laughing …


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BBB ~ YES they do SING …

This is one of those times when I’m thinking negative and pulled up so short that I am ashamed of myself.  Oh you of little faith.  I do say a very big thank you Pat. I’d never have gotten to these without you!

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NO DO NOT LICK YOUR SCREEN! get your skillet out and BAKE with us!

Singing Hinnies

Recipe By: Pat “Feeding My Enthusiasms”  adapted and found on Laura Fitzpatrick’s blog Hello Eco Living
Yield: 8 depending on how large you make them

But, these have no yeast and don’t use the oven, heck, the recipe even reads like these are EASY. 
Oh WAIT the recipe calls for maybe baking soda or not and gives no amount of milk just says enough to make a dough. Now that requires executive decision making. 
Our Kitchen of the Month, Pat of Feeding My Enthusiasms, was being sly about a challenge with such vague directions but hey, a Babe should be able to handle that.
Pat’s recipe uses all purpose flour and I substituted some whole grain and Einkorn and of course added in my always ground flax. I added the 1/8 teaspoon baking soda because it’s second nature to me when I use buttermilk and anytime I’m given the chance, I’ll pick buttermilk. The approximate 1/2 cup buttermilk was perhaps a little more than needed and so I was liberal with dusting the counter when I patted the dough out.
We had these with a simple vegetable soup and I blush to say we ate 6 out of the 7 one evening and shared the biggest one with breakfast in the AM. Gorn wants more …
I would tend to call these Fatty Cuties as the Scots do just because they are so rich. These are gloriously tender and moist because of all the fat.
Future:
Any dried fruit would be a glorious variation on these.  Cardamom would add a sweet note.  AND herbs, this would seem to just beg for an herb and spice touch.

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SINGING HINNIES ~ FATTY CUTTIES

30 grams ground flax seed
130 white whole wheat flour
100 grams Einkorn all-purpose
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/8 teaspoon baking soda
50 grams butter (or margarine)
50 grams bacon fat
50 grams golden raisins
~ 1/2 cup buttermilk

 

1. Sift the flour and baking powder (and baking soda if using) into a bowl.  Rub in the fat (or cut in with pastry blender or two knives) and stir in the currants. 

2. Add enough milk to make a dough.  Roll out onto a floured tray or board and cut with scone or biscuit cutter into rounds of chosen size, usually about 3 inches wide. NOTE: use the 2nd largest biscut cutter.

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3. Heat pan (griddle or cast iron skillet work well but so did my All Clad skillet) and lightly grease.  Place scones onto griddle on a very low heat so that the scones can cook very slowly.  Turn once and cook on other side.  NOTE: my total time was probably 30 minutes on stove top. Next time cut smaller and make slightly thinner.
To check that they are cooked remove one of the scones and tap it gently – it should sound hollow. The top and bottom should be browned but not burnt.

4. Slice in half, butter and enjoy. These are also supposed to be good with strawberry jam. Frankly, butter is over kill … but good.

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These are easy and the payoff is 10 times the effort! Go for it. Bake ‘um up. Check out Feeding My Enthusiasms.

If you’d like to become a Buddy and get one the beautiful badges that Elizabeth created (similar to the one above), just email Pat at plachman at sonic dot net with a photo and the URL of your post, plus a brief description of your experience making these. The deadline is July 29th. The post for the roundup about August 1.
Hope you will join us.  We love to share …

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Red Pepper Coques ~ BBB

Red Pepper Coques

Red Pepper Coques

Feta makes it dinner!

Yes it may be pizza like in vision but this is crunchy very unlike a pizza crust.  Like pizza it comes from the Mediterranean but from Spain.
So it’s different than pizza altogether but then it’s decidedly just as enthralling in flavor and interest.
It’s simple to mix, the only special thing is an overnight in the fridge and that’s easy.
This fits in my favorite category of mix it days ahead of time and put it together like a magic trick for company.  That’s what I did with half the dough, I made this for a big family dinner.  “The Littles” (two girls under 10) said that was really good bread … but then so did all the adults. 

Two nights later, I baked a quarter of the dough and served it with a salad and called it a light dinner.  Four nights later, I served the last quarter dough round with fresh veggies and a guacamole hummus dip and called it dinner.   The dough that keeps on giving!

Yes, Karen (Karen’s Kitchen Stories) our kitchen of the month, this is very simple to do by hand, no food processor here.

Red Pepper Coques

Dough
268 grams bread flour
200 grams white whole wheat flour
30 grams ground flax seed
2 teaspoons sugar, omitted
1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
10 2/3 ounces ice water
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 1/2 teaspoons table or fine sea salt
Red Pepper Topping
1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 large onions, peeled, halved, and thinly sliced
2 cups jarred roasted sliced red peppers
3 tablespoons sugar, omitted
3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
2 bay leaves
3 tablespoons sherry vinegar, Fini Reduction of Balsamic
1/4 cup pine nuts
1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley, fresh basil

1. Dough
In the bowl of a food processor, pulse the flour, sugar, and yeast about 5 times. Turn the processor on, and slowly pour in the ice water and process for about 10 seconds. Let the dough rest for 10 minutes.

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2. Add the oil and the salt to the dough and process for 30 to 60 seconds, until the dough forms a ball. Remove the dough from the the processor, and knead by hand for a few seconds, and form it into a ball. Place it into an oiled bowl, cover, and refrigerate for at least 24 hours, and up to 3 days.

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3. Topping
Heat three tablespoons of the olive oil in a 12 inch non stick frying pan over medium heat. Add the onions, red peppers, sugar, garlic, salt, pepper flakes, and bay leaves. Cover the pan and cook for 10 minutes over medium low.
Remove the lid and continue to cook, stirring regularly, for another 10 to 15 minutes, until the onions are golden brown. Remove the pan from the heat and discard the bay leaves. Transfer the mixture to a heatproof bowl and stir in the vinegar. Cool completely before using. You can make the mixture in advance and refrigerate overnight.


4. To Make the Coques:
Deflate the dough and divide it into four equal sized pieces. Shape each piece into a tight ball and place, seam side down on your work surface, and cover with oiled plastic wrap. Let rest for an hour.
Place oven racks in the upper and lower third positions and preheat the oven to 500 degrees F. Brush two half sheet pans with 2 tablespoons of olive oil each.

5. Place one dough ball on your work surface, and roll it out to a 15 inch by 5 inch oval. Place it on the baking sheet, lengthwise. Repeat with the rest of the dough balls, two per baking sheet. If the dough springs back, let it rest for another 10 to 20 minutes, and re-roll. Dock each about 15 times with a fork. Brush each oblong piece of dough with the rest of the olive oil.

6. Bake the dough for 8 minutes, switching the pans at the four minute mark.
Remove the pans from the oven, and spread them with the red pepper and onion mixture. Sprinkle with the pine nuts. Place the baking sheets back into the oven, and bake for 16 minutes, switching and rotating the pans at the 8 minute mark. Continue to bake until the flatbreads are golden and crispy.
Remove the pans from the oven and let cool on the pans for about 5 minutes. Sprinkle with the parsley, and transfer to a cutting board to slice and serve.

Red Pepper Coques

Feta makes it dinner!

There is simply no way you should not bake this … it is just delightful. Too good to pass up and so simple to put together.
If you want to bake along, email Karen your photo or blog link to karen.h.kerr@gmail.com and she’ll feature you in a follow up post and send you a really cool badge.


7 Comments

BBB – Lariano -Style Bread

Here’s the thing people: Some things you can hurry.   Two things you hurry at your peril: small children and natural sourdough breads … I rapidly learned long ago when I had my own young toddlers, hurry is not in their repertoir. Just doesn’t happen. The glory of being a Grandparent is we generally move at toddler speed naturally.

Then there is the natural slow process of leavening sourdough breads … yeah, I don’t fully appreciate that slower speed yet. It just don’t happen to speed up sourdough.  I thought I had a starter … probably it was slightly underdeveloped but as I was getting down to the wire on time, I went with it.  Then I was on the wire and baked it.  I should have waited.  Still, as is often the case with home made, it’s excellent bread.  I’ve just had 4 slices and look forward to toast in the AM and sandwiches for a picnic tomorrow.

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Elizabeth is our Kitchen of the Month.   And the bread – oh goodness!  And the book it’s from, my heart be still. Back in the mists of time, I came across a NYT article by Mark Bitteman featuring a baker named Jim Lahey and a No Knead Bread recipe.  The recipe became a blogging hit.  It intreged me so without fully reading the recipe as I am still prone to do, I went at it.  Unbeknown to each other, Karen (BakeMyDay) had started the same recipe just hours different from me.  So we “internet baked” together.  My bread came out of the oven about the same time Karen’s did but she was in the Netherlands where it was mid-day … I was in Texas where it was not (it was OH-dark-thirty, middle of the night).  The bread was gorgeous, incredible crust AND it’s been the only bread I’ve ever had sing to me!  I was underwhelmed by a rather moist crumb but was delighted with the entire experience.

The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook is the first Jim Lahey book I’ve bought … and his writing is as lyrical as my singing bread.  This man loves baking bread.  The recipes are gorgeous.  I don’t believe there is fault in his book or recipes, the fault is my going to fast with the BBB Lariano Style Bread.  A few days after I got the book, I baked the Pane Di Lino and Gorn continues to ask when am I going to bake it again.  It really was heavenly and I will be baking it again soon.

I followed Elizabeth’s recipe as on her blog … except I cut too many hours at each step.  This takes days, really days. But you are never spending more than a few minutes at each step.  You do have to keep watch as to when the dough is ready to move on to the next step.  Just keep peeking.  Have patience.

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We would love for you to join in as a buddy baker this month! You don’t have to have a blog to participate, a picture will do.  Just send a picture or a link to your post of your finished bread to the host kitchen by the 29th of this month.  You will receive a Bread Baking Buddy graphic to keep or add to your post, and be included in our Buddy round up at the end of the month.  New recipes are posted every month on the 16th.  Check out our Facebook group to see the participants’ baking results during that time.

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Tomorrow I have dough in the fridge to bake the Pizza Bianca Alla Romana, Version 1.  I think I’ve taken my time with this one, maybe mainly because I was trying to rush getting this bread baked for the Babes.


9 Comments

Nazook – Gata ~ BBB

Nazook, Gata ~ BBB 

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What makes it bread? If it has yeast, does that make it bread? How big does bread have to be before it’s a roll or a bun?  Bread can be sweet, most would agree? Is this bread or pastry?
If the Babes are baking it, it’s bread. That’s my story and I’m sticking to it. I think these will stick with you too.
Kelly is our kitchen of the month! As she notes, it maybe an odd name and it does have many names from various places but whatever you call it and whatever you stuff it with, these are utterly delicious.  Hooray for cookie like yeasted sweet bread. I thank you for these small gems.  Gorn thanks you for each one of the 15 he’s placed in his mouth in the last 2 hours. I only rolled two logs because I just had a feeling these were going to be way too big a hit. So the dough is back in the fridge and I’ll bake more tomorrow and take some to the library girls.
Changes? Oh but very small. I added my usual ground flax meal, used more vanilla, added lemon zest to dough (because if you’re going to juice a lemon why waste the zest) and since I found maple roasted walnuts I used those in place of plain. So maybe my changes were more than small but whatever they were, they worked well.
Regret: I didn’t think of using coconut flour until after I mixed the filling.

Kitchen of the Month:  Kelly blogging at A Messy Kitchen

Nazook, Gata ~ BBB 

Recipe By: Mom’s Authentic Assyrian Recipes
Yield: 48 yeasted sweet breads/pastries

DOUGH
2 1/4 teaspoons (7g) active dry yeast
1 cup (227g) sour cream – quark
3 1/4 cups (390g) White Whole Wheat flour
30 grams ground flax seed
1/2 teaspoon (6 g) salt
1 cup (226g) chilled unsalted butter
1 egg
1 tbsp (12g) vegetable oil
zest from 1 lemon
1 teaspoon (5g) lemon juice
FILLING
1 cup (226g) butter melted (+ 3tbsp melted, optional)
2 cups (240g) White Whole Wheat flour … coconut or almond meal/flour!
1 cup (198g) brown sugar
1 cup (113g) maple roasted walnuts finely chopped
1 teaspoon (5g) vanilla
1 teaspoon (2g) cardamom
1/8 teaspoon Malib optional but I have some
1/8 teaspoon Nutmeg optional
Cinnamon
GLAZE
2 egg yolks beaten
1 teaspoon (5g) yogurt OR quark (water?)

DOUGH:
Combine yeast, flour, salt and butter and blend with your fingers until crumbly.
Add egg, oil, lemon juice & zest, and sour cream. Mix until incorporated.  Knead the dough on a floured surface for 5 minutes, or until no longer sticky.  Add more flour if necessary.  (I  added some more flour).
Form into a ball, and to follow tradition, mark with a +, symbolizing a cross. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate 5 hours, or overnight.

FILLING:
Mix flour, brown sugar, walnuts, and cardamom. Add vanilla to melted butter and pour slowly into flour mixture while stirring.  Stir until the mixture is smooth.  (Mine ended up a beautiful streusel consistency, at first a paste and then nice and crumbly as it cooled.)

PREHEAT oven to 350°F.

ASSEMBLY:
I omitted brushing the dough with more butter as I thought there was already plenty of butter.
Remove dough from refrigerator and divide into 8 equal portions. (I weighted the dough and divided by 8 then cut off that amount to shape.)  Roll each dough ball into a 10 x 6” rectangle.   Spread 1/8th of the filling over each rectangle, leaving a ½-inch border.  Cover with a piece of parchment paper.  Press down lightly with your hands, so that the filling adheres to the dough.  Fold the edges in ½-inch over the filling.
Roll into a cylinder.  Gently flatten with the palms of your hands. (Do this because they puff quite a lot in the oven.)
Cut each roll into 6 pieces and arrange on 2 parchment lined cookie sheets.  Brush liberally with the egg glaze.
BAKE for 30-35 minutes, or until golden brown.  Excellent with coffee or hot tea.  Not too sweet, just sweet enough!

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Notes for future baking:

This dough would make terrific mincemeat cookie shaped like this, would need to make it drier – maybe more nuts or coconut flour.
Fruit Filling: DATES, FIG, mixed with the nuts, this could be fairly dry.
Savory Filling: This dough begs for any number of savory fillings.  Spinach, feta or goat cheese, red chili pepper- perhaps oat bran would dry/thicken.

I would have no hesitation to brush the flattened dough with a mix of cinnamon and brown sugar roll them and bake…even just brushed with butter and rolled plain these would be lovely.  Since you get 8 rolls, it seems to me you have 8 opportunities to play in the sandbox.

Note that vanilla, cardamom, (and cinnamon for that matter), enhance the perception of sweetness, so if you don’t use both the vanilla and the cardamom, they may want a tiny bit extra sugar.  As it is, there is only 1 tsp sugar per pastry and they are super satisfying because they are so rich.

These are actually fairly simple and easy to knead and assemble.

We would love for you to bake along with us!  Just bake your version of this bread by March 30th and send Kelly a note with your results and a picture or link to your post at eleyana(AT)aol(DOT)com with Buddy Bread in the subject line and you will be included in our buddy round up at the beginning of next month. You’ll also get your Buddy badge graphic to keep and/or add to your post.  You don’t have to have a blog to participate, a picture is fine!

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So much better than anything from the store!


12 Comments

10 Years Bread Baking Babes

The Bread Baking Babes have a cloudy past. You have your choice as to where and who all the histrionics originated with. There could be some case made that it started with Karen of BakeMyDay. There could be some case made that it started with Ilva. And there could be some case made that Ilva put a name to it while we were baking a Daring Baker challenge over what was then Skype. Out of those clouds the Babes emerged. We’re Beautiful, Boisterous, Brilliant, Bold, Buxom, Busy, Bewitching, Brash, Bourbon Basted, Bread Baking Babes, that’s 12 B’s. And, as you know, B-12 is one of the essential nutrients that’s found in….bread! (I believe Lynn put those altogether for us.) We’ve rallied at the opportunity to be called Babes. I mean, when you get to be my age, you never pass up an opportunity to be called Babe!

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That’s how my first post for this bread started 10 years ago.   And since then?  We have been baking, oh Babe have we been baking! This month’s recipe was chosen by Karen from BakeMyDay 10 year ago.  I believe Lien is the only Babe to have managed every bread we’ve bake, one every month.  Yes, even I think I can do the simple math on that one 10 years times 12 months gives you 120 loaves of bread.  I’ve missed several but I’ve tried not to count.  Even so, it’s a lot of bread but the fun has been so much more than the bread.  I’ve loved every minute AND I’ve loved ever Babe.

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Over those 10 years, we’ve all baked a LOT of bread. A number of Babes have retired for many and varied reasons. But, once a Babe always a Babe.

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Karen, golly wow 10 years, so many breads, so many good times. This bread was a stunner to me 10 years ago and it’s still a thrill to take it out of the oven.  Many folds, LONG rises but so glorious.  Thank You so many times for so Much.  Check out Karen’s BakeMyDay for the recipe write up because I’m not going to put it up here just right yet.

Lien, gracious what can I say. You are a wonder. 120 breads and all our badges for Babes and Buddies. Never forget.  You can retire, take a break BUT: Once a Babe, Always a Babe.  Thank you for everything.

I am so happy you baked again with us Sara.  I understand entirely that the flour on the top matters not because this is just wonderful bread.  It was a joy and stunning the first time around 10 years ago and is again every time I’ve baked.  Yes, I loved that Dan’s Garlic as well!

Cathy. Awe struck I am. Yeast water and grows her own grains.

Karen yes we have two. Karen talks about being a newbie and this being a surprise. I agree this is always a glorious surprise when I take it out of the oven but you know by the holes in the crumb Karen is not a newbie, she’s a Babe.

Judy this bread wants/tries to be lazy but the oven seems to give it that oven spring go and you get those lovely holes! Babe Success.

Elizabeth Truly for the Babes this has proven to be an iconic bread. I thought is thrilling the first time and then every time since taking it from my oven. Pinto Bean soup and this bread buttered, glorious breakfast! Really Elizabeth you were a Babe from the start and only became more so after the invite ;-). Glorious bread, lovely color. Wonderful times, glorious bread.

Pat Oh, Pat I love the anniversary photo with the dough streaking down. Your bread is glorious. Now I need another loaf to make avocado toast with! Super to have you with us Babe.

Kelly Only with us 2 years! Ha, from the looks of your bread it’s been forever and you did it without bread flour? Oh, only part Spelt and Kamut, more challenging flours. That’s definitely a Babe.

Aparna Great crown for our 10th! Difficult to know how different flours will behave until we try them all. I appreciate that only two to eat the breads is tricky, I found it much easier when there were more friends and family around to share.

The hardest part about this bread is to know where to start telling you about it. You see I baked it three times in the last three weeks (10 years ago). In the last ten years I’ve baked this bread I would guess at least once a year and some years more. This time around I’ve only baked it once …  But the year is young.

I will follow tomorrow with the recipe here but you can know I used sprouted whole wheat for 30% of my flour and of course I added some flax 30 grams.

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If you would like to become a Bread Baking Buddy, here’s how it works:

  • The Kitchen of the Month (Tanna this time!).
  • Email me with BBB 10th anniversary in the subject line, with your name and the link to the post.
  • Post your “baking the bread” experience on your blog mentioning Bread Baking Babes with a link to the MyKitchenInHalfCups.com.
  • The Kitchen of the Month will put up a list of our Bread Baking Buddies at her site and send you a neat BBB award for this bread that you can then add to your post on your blog.

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I need to bake again so I can dip it in olive oil and pepper.


10 Comments

BBB Champagne Baba ~ Bread Baking Babe’s Bundt Babas

Our indomitable Lien is Kitchen of the Month and she brought us a wonderful not to sweet festive holiday bread.  Thank you a BBBBB times over!

BBBBB … Yes, that would be Bread Baking Babe’s Bundt Babas! And these are simple (just go step by step), fun (when is it not fun to poke, poke and poke your food) and visually festive!

Why did these take me so long to actually get to baking?  A pan, what pan could I find to bake them in? Yes, I know a loaf pan would have served perfectly well but that’s not really special.

I think most of the Babes like these best small and I would love to try little small ones but who knows where my pans might be packed. Small ones just couldn’t happen this time for me.
I think these are great for the holidays. I baked them twice today and they made welcome little gifts especially as small bundts!

Lots of ways to change these around flavor, fruit jam wise and liquid wise.  They are so worth it.

Champagne Baba

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sponge:
100 grams water
1 teaspoon instant dry yeast
1 tablespoon sugar, omitted
100 grams bread flour
dough:
180 grams bread flour
½ teaspoon fine salt
¼ teaspoon instant dry yeast
1,5 teaspoon vanilla sugar, teaspoon vanilla
3 large eggs
90 grams melted butter
soaking syrup:
150 grams sugar
177 grams water
120 grams champagne (or Asti Spumante or fruit juice)
200 grams apricot jam (or use a sugar glaze)

Directions:

1. Mix all the ingredients for the sponge together in a large bowl (the one you’ll be kneading the dough in). Now sprinkle 180 g bread flour over the sponge, so it is covered and leave to rest for about 1 hour.

2. Now add the salt, ¼ tsp dry yeast, vanilla sugar and eggs. Start to mix this. If using a stand mixer, use the paddle attachment. When it comes together after a few minutes, add the melted (and slightly cooled) butter and keep working it. The dough is a bit batter like, but be sure to get some gluten developed.

3. Place it in the moulds. You can use a loaf tin or a round baking form (I used 3 mini bundt pans), filled about half way up. Cover with plastic and leave to rise until 2-3 cm under the rim of the mould. Mine took about 90 minutes in warm spot.

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4. Don’t forget to preheat the oven to 180ºC (350-360ºF).

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5. Heat and stir the champagne/Spumante until the sugar dissolves and thickens slightly.

6. Bake for about 45-55 minutes, until golden brown on top. If the bread gets too dark too soon, protect the top with a sheet of tin foil. Check the temperature in the bread with a thermometer, it should be about 93ºC.
Take out of the oven and the tin and place on a deep dish. Poke the bread with a long wooden skewer from top to bottom. Brush the syrup all over it, and get as much as possible inside the bread, so take your time. Collect the syrup from the plate and keep pouring and brushing it, until all in absorbed in the bread.
Now heat the apricot jam in a small pan and let it boil, add a little water if it is too thick. Brush or pour it over the top. You can also opt for a simple sugar glaze. This topping keeps the moisture in.

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And no doubt you wonder why my apricot “jam” is so thick … because it’s not jam, I couldn’t go running 20 miles to the nearest store in a foot of snow and ice so I made a “jam” out of the Asti Spumante and dried apricots. Oh, yes it was tasty.
7. The baba is best eaten on the day that it’s baked. But if not, keep in the fridge.

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They’re not difficult to make, so have a go and bake these for Christmas or as a delicious in-between for new years eve. Become our Bread Baking Buddy, mix, bake, post and enjoy this recipe and let us know how they turned out. Send you details to Lien (notitievanlien (at) gmail (dot) com) and Lien will send you the Bread Baking Buddy Badge for your efforts to place with our post, if you like. Please have your entries send in before the end of the year.
BBBuddies are not very active lately, but if there are any of course she’ll make a round up. Happy Baking…. and remember you only need a little champagne for this, so you can party with what’s left in the bottle. Happy baking and Happy holidays! 🎄🎄🎄
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14 Comments

BBB ~ English Muffins

Holidays … a full house … chaos … something special … make ahead … fun … hassle free … simple but brilliant … food … wait did you say food, as in feed this full house with chaos full strength and make it special.  And you expect to make it ahead, have it be fun, hassle free and brilliant. 
You are living in an alternate universe and not in this one.
No, truly, our Kitchen of the Month, Pat – Feeding My Enthusiasms, at least has a part of breakfast for us.  Even if you don’t have a crowd you can so two small batches over 2 days and have fresh homemade English muffins to be extravagant with honey, butter, maple syrup and jam … maybe even a peanut butter and cream cheese in the afternoon.
You may ask, why corn meal?  Over the years I’ve seen English muffins with corn meal on the bottoms and I’ve seen semolina.  Is one better than the other or more authentic?  A quick internet search I did this morning, didn’t turn up a consensus.  The function of either is to prevent sticking to the pan, griddle or spatula and lend a crispness to the crust and bottom.  I can’t help thinking it may also be to pull some moisture out of the dough while they rise, seems logical that would result.  In different locations corn meal may be more readily available and cheaper than semolina and would so be more likely to be used.  Either will serve the same function and work well.
The only tricky part of these is getting them reasonably done without burning the bottom.  Elizabeth solved that for me because my copy of Rose Levy Beranbaum, Quick Breads, Little Quick Breads, Little Yeast Breads, and Batter Breads, The Bread Bible, p170 is still packed away and I wasn’t bright enough on my own to consider sticking my thermometer  into the center of one of these to see were it was.  Try for 190°.  Elizabeth finished her’s in the oven which I think I’ll try when I finish my remaining six this afternoon but it maybe just turning the griddle down and cooking longer would work as well.

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Recipe from: Pat “Feeding My Enthusiasms”  From:  SeriousEats

English Muffins
Yield: 12 – I got 11

245 grams bread flour
40 grams rye flour (originally this 40 grams was bread flour)
140 grams whole wheat flour
11  grams table salt or (11 grams kosher or 2 3/4 teaspoons)
4 grams instant dry yeast 1 1/4 teaspoons
340 grams ounces cold milk
100 grams honey, I used only 55 grams
1 large egg white, cold
fine cornmeal to cover muffins on two sheet pans with space around them – Elle), don’t skip this
bacon or butter or oil, for griddling

Make the Dough and Let Rise: 
In a large bowl, mix bread flour, whole wheat flour, kosher salt, and yeast together until well combined.
Add milk, honey, and egg white, stirring until smooth, about 5 minutes.
Cover with plastic and set aside until spongy, light, and more than doubled, 4 to 5 hours at 70°F.

For the Second Rise:  Thickly cover a rimmed aluminum baking sheet with an even layer of cornmeal.
With a large spoon, dollop out twelve 2 2/3-ounce (75g) portions of dough I only got 11 muffins none weighed more than 78 grams or less than 72 grams; it’s perfectly fine to do this by eye.
If you’d like, pinch the irregular blobs here and there to tidy their shape.  My dough was to sticky to do much shaping, I went with what fell on the pan.  They all came out looking like … English muffins
Sprinkle with additional cornmeal, cover with plastic, and refrigerate at least 12 and up to 42 hours.

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Rising on the griddle! Oolala!

To Griddle and Serve:  Preheat an electric griddle to 325°F or warm a 12-inch cast iron skillet or griddle over medium-low heat. When sizzling-hot, add half the butter and melt; griddle muffins until their bottoms are golden brown, about 8 minutes. Flip with a square-end spatula and griddle as before. Transfer to a wire rack until cool enough to handle, then split the muffins by working your thumbs around the edges to pull them open a little at a time. Toast before serving and store leftovers in an airtight container up to 1 week at room temperature (or 1 month in the fridge).

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Special Equipment:  Flexible spatula,  rimmed baking sheet, griddle (electric or cast iron) or 12-inch cast iron skillet, square-end spatula, wire rack

Seriously easy.  Oh and that photo reminds me: homemade slow cooker apple butter is an absolute winner on these too!

Go for it why don’t you. Bake with us. Check out Pat, FeedingMyEnthusiasms for all the scoop and be a Bread Baking Buddy.  Don’t forget all the other Babes, we all had different experiences.