MyKitchenInHalfCups

Once Upon a time: Cooking … Baking … Traveling … Laughing …


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BBB ~ Cinnamon Raisin Struan Bread, the Babes will Swirl with this one!

Sing Praises here to Pat “Feeding My Enthusiasms”, who went on a year end cookbook clean out of her book cases and found our bread this month in Sacramental Magic in a Small-Town Cafe by Br Peter Reinhart.  Somehow bread just doesn’t go out of date.

Cinnamon Raisin Bread, you think you’ve enjoyed cinnamon raisin bread but this recipe has now taken top honors in our house.  I’ve baked hundreds of cinnamon raisin bread loaves.  When we sailed the Atlantic, I baked two loaves every other day.  Two loaves of Oatmeal Bread from James Beard on Bread.   One was a plain loaf and one was Cinnamon Raisin loaf.  It was terrific bread but this recipe is terrific bread and is filled with whole grain health goodness.  

In the past I’ve always made my Cinnamon Raisin Bread with the raisins in the swirl.  Gorn and I both like this with the raisins mixed into the dough much better.

This makes three full sized loaves. You may think you shouldn’t make the full recipe … you’d be wrong if you think you wouldn’t be able to use all the bread … I don’t think you’ll be able to stop eating this bread.  When I make this again I will try using 4 cups white whole wheat and 3 cups bread flour.

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Rising …

Cinnamon Raisin Struan Bread

4 cups high-gluten bread flour

3 cups whole wheat bread flour

1/2 cup uncooked polenta (coarse ground cornmeal)

1/2 cup rolled oats

1/2 cup brown sugar

1/3 cup wheat bran, used wheat germ

4 teaspoons salt

40 grams ground flax seed

3 tablespoons yeast

1/2 cup cooked brown rice

1/4 cup honey

3/4 cup buttermilk

3 cups water, should have stopped at 2 cups 2/3 had to use extra flour

3 cups raisins

SWIRL

1/2 cup cinnamon sugar (1 part cinnamon to 2 parts brown sugar)

4 tablespoons butter, softened

1. In a large bowl, combine all the dry ingredients, including the salt and yeast (unless you are using active dry yeast, which should be activated in warm water and added with the wet ingredients.)

2. Add the cooked rice, honey, and buttermilk and mix together. Then add 1 cup of water, reserving the rest to add as needed. With your hands, squeeze the ingredient together until they make a ball. Sprinkle some flour on the counter and turn the ball out of the bowl and begin kneading. Add small quantities of water as needed. *****Adding the full 1 1/2 cup of water was no where near enough. I added another full cup … and then another half.  See 5.

3. Because Struan has so many whole grains, it takes longer to knead than most breads. Allow at least 15 minutes, but be prepared to knead for 20. The dough will change before your eyes, lightening in color, becoming gradually more elastic and evenly grained. The finished dough should be tacky, not sticky, lightly golden, stretchy and elastic, rather than porridge-like. When you push the heels of your hands into the dough it should give way but not tear. If it flakes or crumbles, add a little more water.

4. When the dough seems ready, add the raisins and knead for 2 more minutes, until the raisins are evenly distributed.

5. **** I added too much water too fast and had a VERY wet dough, too heavy and wet to kneed.  So, after trying to kneed adding extra flour, I either pretended to be an expert bread maker or made an executive decision – I’ll let you decide – I switched to a lift and fold technique.  I did a lift and fold  four times.

6. Wash out the mixing bowl and dry it thoroughly. Put in the dough and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap, or place the bowl inside a plastic bag. Allow the dough to rise in a warm place for about 1 hour, until it has roughly doubled in size.

7. Cut the dough into 3 equal pieces (or more if you want to make smaller loaves). With a rolling pin, roll out each piece into a rectangle. Sprinkle about 1 tablespoon of cinnamon sugar over the surface, spreading it evenly. ******I used about 3 tablespoons cinnamon sugar. I have used brown sugar to make cinnamon sugar for forever now because we both just like the extra caramel flavor.

From the bottom of the long side, roll up the dough into tight loaves, tucking and pinching the seams into one line on the bottom. Put the loaves, seam side down, in greased bread pans (for full-sized loaves your pan should be around 9 x 4 1/3 x 3 inches). Cover and allow the loaves to rise until doubled in size.

8. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. When the loaves have risen, cresting over the tops of the pans, place on the center shelf and bake for about 45 minutes. The loaves should be nicely domed and dark gold. The bottom and sides should be a uniform light gold and there should be an audible, hollow  thwack when you tap the bottom of the loaf. If the loaves are not ready, remove them from the pans and place them back in the oven until done. They will bake quickly when removed from the pans.

9. When done, brush a little butter over the tops, then sprinkle with the remaining cinnamon sugar, coating each loaf with a layer of cinnamon crust.

***** I forgot the cinnamon sugar topping but would like to have done that.

Allow the breads to cool on wire racks for at least 40 minutes before slicing. This bread makes exceptional breakfast toast and French toast!

Bake.  Bake Cinnamon Raisin Straun Bread.  Tell the Kitchen of the Month, Pat at FeedingMyEnthusiasms!  You’ll be thanking her for years to come.  You know you want to Swirl.


9 Comments

BBB ~ Fouace Nantaise

How can baking bread continue to fascinate, intrigue and surprise?  How can there be so few and so simple ingredients and continue to be new?  How can I continue to fool my self starting a recipe with “I can’t imagine I’ll like this?  I really don’t want to make much effort to find orange blossom water.” and end with “This is brilliant.  I do like orange.”  I tried the grocery stores for orange blossom water, even a little heath food store in town.  It’s a small place.  Rose water but no orange blossom water.  Only because Gorn makes such an effort to see that I have ingredients did we make the trek into San Luis Obispo to … Whole Foods!  Wow and I found all kinds of sprouted flours!

I have avoided using orange with chocolate forever and I think that may never change.  But this bread … gorgeous.

I had trouble with this rising.  Seemed to give several of us trouble.  Some of the issues I believe I understand and can easily change.  Karen used SAF yeast and she’s right it works better with these heavily enriched doughs.  I just didn’t have any here.  I would use a full teaspoon next time.  And I would use the sugar which I forgot in this bake.  I think I will search out some orange blossom honey for baking this again.

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I tend to have a heavy hand with flavor and didn’t actually measure the orange blossom water.  I thought about Elizabeth saying the orange was not pronounced when she baked this.  Now I realize it doesn’t make sense, me saying I don’t like baking with orange and then telling you I doubled the orange blossom water … but for whatever reason that is what I did and that was why I also did not omit the orange zest.  I think I must have gotten the idea from Elizabeth, this bread was suppose to be about orange.

Orange.  Orange juice.  Orange sunshine.  Brilliant Orange January Sunshine.  I think that is as it should be.

Jamie ~ Life’s a Feast ~ will paint you a brilliant word picture of Nantes and this bread.  This recipe will not appear in her book coming out this fall but I’m sure it is representative of her glorious writing and attention to creative recipe development.

Elizabeth ~ Blog from OUR Kitchen ~ our brilliant Kitchen of the Month.  Always creates a wild cacophony when we gather round her kitchen table … heck, there’s always glorious chaos when she’s in the kitchen.  And always something wonderful comes to the table from that chaos.  Wonderful like Fouace Nantaise.  Elizabeth talks about this being a flower, I think it’s more like January sunshine.

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BBB ~ Fouace Nantaise

Elizabeth ~ Kitchen of the Month

50 grams (3+1/2 Tbsp) unsalted butter
60 grams (60ml) milk
3 grams (3/4 tsp) active dry yeast
7 grams (~1+1/2tsp) orange blossom water
45 grams Rum
2 eggs, body temperature, lightly beaten
250 grams flours divided
» 50g (6 Tbsp) sprouted spelt
» 185g (1+1/2 c) unbleached all-purpose
15 grams wheat germ
zest of one orange, optional
25 g (2 Tbsp) sugar
4 g (~1/2 tsp fine) sea salt
milk or cream, for wash on shaped loaf

1. MIXING: Melt butter.

2. Whisk milk, eggs, orange blossom water, rum and orange zest with melted butter.

Why did I opt for rum?  The only thing I’ve ever made/cooked/baked that Gorn said he did not like was a Grand Marnier Souffle.

3. Elizabeth’s directions:  Pour milk into a largish mixing bowl. Add the melted butter to the milk to raise the temperature to body temperature (check with a thermometer OR by placing a drop on the inside of your wrist – if the milk feels cool, it’s too cold; if it feels hot, it’s too hot; if it feels like nothing, it’s ju-u-u-st right). Add yeast and whisk in until it has dissolved.
Adding them one at a time, whisk in eggs, then pour in orange liqueur and orange blossom water. Place flours, sugar, salt, and orange zest (if using) on top. Using a wooden spoon, stir until the flour has been absorbed. (Traditionally, the bread is made with rum rather than orange liqueur. The first time I made this, I did use rum, but I really wished that the flavour was more orangey so decided to use orange liqueur instead.)

4. Whisk together the yeast, salt and flours.
Pour liquid ingredients into dry and mix.

5. KNEADING: Using one hand to turn the bowl and the other to dig down to the bottom to lift the dough up to the top, turn, fold, turn, fold, etc. the dough until it is smooth and elastic. As you knead, resist the temptation to add more flour or water.

6. Once the dough is kneaded, cover the bowl with a plate and allow the dough to rise, until almost completely doubled, on the counter in a non-drafty area.

7. SHAPEING: When the dough has doubled, it’s time to shape. (To check to see if it’s ready, poke a hole in the top of the dough. If the hole fills up, it hasn’t risen enough. If there is a whoosh of air and the dough deflates a little, it has risen too much. If the hole stays in exactly the same configuration and the dough remains otherwise intact, it is ju-u-st right.) Turn the risen dough out onto a very lightly floured board (just the smallest dusting will be enough). Divide the dough evenly into 7 pieces.
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8. Shape each piece into a ball. Place one ball in the center of a parchment-lined cookie tray. Arrange the other six balls of dough loosely around the center ball – to form a flower. Cover with a damp (clean) tea towel followed by plastic grocery bags and leave to rise until almost doubled. (To test, using a floured finger, gently press against the side of the shaped bread. If the indentation immediately jumps back, it’s not ready; if it stays indented, it has over-risen; if it gradually fills in, it’s ready to go.

9. I pulled off a large ball and made that the center.  Divided the remaining dough into 8 balls for the flower petals.

10. BAKING: Preheat the oven to 350F. Gently brush the top of the risen bread with milk (or cream). Put the tray onto the top shelf of the oven (to prevent the bread from burning on the bottom) and bake for about 30 minutes until the bread is a “deep golden brown”. Jamie also writes that the outer “petals” of the flower “will have just started to pull away from the center ball”.

Are you in need of January Sunshine?  Here it is.  Bake this loaf!  It’s brilliant and you can be too.  Elizabeth will have all the details of how to be a Bread Baking Buddy before the end of the day.
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We all need sunshine in January.  Bake.  Make sunshine.

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8 Comments

BBB ~ Sourdough Red Beet Braid

Wild hairs … they aren’t called that for nothing are they.  That’s why we have brushes.  Right well, who knows why but I started thinking I didn’t like the sound of sweet in this beet bread.  I first considered that I had over a quart of liquid pickled beet juice that I would love to have used.  I guess I thought about that too long and just couldn’t get my head around it.  Then I searched out some other flavoring to tone down the earthy aroma of my beets because my beets were earthy.  Beets pair well with cloves, ginger, allspice, apples and walnuts.  That sounded really good.  Sounded like Christmas, festive.  I really liked the walnut idea.  My walnuts were rancid.  Apples, if I used apples, that would be a perfect sweetener … adding too much liquid.  In the end, I brushed all that aside (perhaps for another time) and went with Cathy’s sugar and vanilla and honestly it was just perfect.

Cathy from Bread Experience is our hostess this month and I really did enjoy her kitchen table.  Cathy I thank you deeply for all your testing/experimentation.  Raw beets  will now be my go to red!

I do love adding sprouted wheat as it gives a heady wheat aroma to any bread and it seemed to work well here.

I’ve done lots of Bread Braids.  Most have come out looking fabulous.  This one … not so much.  Still this bread braid has much going for it.  I’ve learned how beets work in dough and how red you can go with bread.  It has a wonderful crumb and is delightfully moist and soft.  A bread well worth baking and learning from … and definitely worth eating.  That’s why we bake after all.

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Sourdough Red Beet Braid

Cathy (breadexperience)

Yield: 2 to 3 loaves

Ingredients:

Overnight Levain:

25-30 grams sourdough starter (or 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast)

100 grams bread flour (or all-purpose)

40 grams water

Final Dough:

700 grams bread flour or all-purpose flour (divided 450, 200, 50), 250 grams of the 700 was sprouted wheat the remaining was AP)

2 tablespoons sugar, I used brown sugar

1 teaspoon fine sea salt

2 tablespoons oil

1 large eggs, lightly beaten

3 egg yolks, lightly beaten

40 grams water

338 grams raw beets cut into small chunks, blend until smooth

1 teaspoon vanilla, optional

Chia seeds, optional

Egg Wash:

Leftover eggs whites mixed with a little water

Directions:

1. Puree the beets in a blender, adding the water gradually. Puree until the mixture is completely smooth.  This will take a little while unless you have a high-powered blender.  Weigh the beet puree mixture, if it weighs more or less than 380 grams, you’ll either need to add more or less flour.

The beet I had weighted 438 grams. I added 40 grams water.  I used 400 grams of the beet and water blended mix.

2. Mix the flour (reserving 100 grams), sugar and salt together in a large bowl.  In a separate bowl, mix the pureed beets, beaten eggs and egg whites, oil and vanilla, if using.  Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir slightly.  Add the sourdough on top and mix thoroughly.  My mixer remains packed in a box somewhere.  I mixed by hand with no issues.  I did add additional flour.

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Mix until all of the ingredients are incorporated and there are no bits of dry flour.  Let it rest for 30 minutes. 

3. Remove the mixture to a floured surface or you can continue doing this part in the mixing bowl.  Gradually add 75 – 100 grams of flour while kneading the dough.  It should become very supple and workable.  Resist the urge to add too much flour.  Unless you change the hydration, you shouldn’t need too much more flour.  I think since I added the extra beet blend, I needed about an additional 1/2 flour.

4. Clean out the bowl, or scrape it down really well. Shape the dough into a ball and place it back in the bowl. Cover with a kitchen towel.  Let it proof for 4 to 5 hours.  Perform a fold after the 1st hour, place back in the bowl. Repeat at the 2nd hour.  Let rest for 2 to 3 more hours.  Perform an additional fold if necessary.

Ah, I only did one fold.

5. After the bulk fermentation, divide the dough for braiding. I divided the dough in half and made two loaves with double braids.

Roll out the ropes for the braids, shape the braids and tuck the ends under. 

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6. Place the braided loaves on a parchment-lined baking sheet and brush with egg wash.  Let them proof 1 to 1 1/2 hours, until they have grown to about 1 1/2 times their original size.

7. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. (or 325 degrees F. for the double braid) and place the oven rack on the middle shelf.

Brush the loaf again with egg wash and sprinkle the top with poppy seeds.  No poppy seeds here, I used chia seeds.

Bake the loaf for 20 minutes, rotate the pan for even baking, then bake an additional 20 to 35 minutes depending on the size of the loaf. It should register 190 degrees in the center.

Transfer the loaf to a wire rack and let it cool for 1 hour before slicing.

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Can you believe how RED!  Red is my color.

Beets and goat cheese are a natural and it is a spectacular combo with this … oh yes and a glass of red is alright as well.  Serve with goat cheese, red wine and a good friend. 

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Cutting it loses its red intensity but I very happy with the color and the good eating!

I just know you want to bake red and bake with us!

Cathy of Bread Experience is the host kitchen for December and your challenge is to make beet bread. You can use any color beets and make any shape loaf you like, however, I think the braid makes a spectacular presentation.

Just bake some beet bread and post about it on your blog and on the Bread Baking Babes FB page by the 30th of this month.  If you don’t have a blog, please post a photo of your bread on the BBB FB page.

Send an email to breadexperience at gmail dotcom with BBB December Beet Bread in the subject and I’ll send you the Buddy Badge to display on your blog.

All the Babes look forward to seeing  your beet bread.

Baking makes us ALL happy!


6 Comments

BBB ~ Bialys

I first saw Bialys in London.  I don’t know why but Bialys have never really called my name.  Bagels I always found interesting; because they have an involved process that makes them a challenge perhaps.  I haven’t really avoided Bialys but for whatever reason, I’ve never burned to bake them either.  Now that I’ve baked them, I know I’ll be baking them again.  The are really simple to bake and every time Gorn puts one in his mouth it’s “These are really good.”

Our host kitchen this month is Judy of Judy’s Gross Eats.  Thank you for getting me to finally bake Bialys!

This recipe made 15 for me.  We’ve had them plain, Gorn put jam one one, I put cream cheese and jalepeno jelly on one, we put hamburgers on two, toasted two and topped them poached eggs and finally peanut butter.  They are just good.  I have to bake them again to try the bagel traditional lox on them!

Bialys
Recipe By: Judy(Gross Eats) inspired by The Hot Bread Kitchen: Artisanal Baking from Around the World.
Yield: 16
Recipe #1 from Elizabeth Faulkner
Filling
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 teaspoon poppy seeds
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 onion minced, per bialy
Dough
17 ounces bread flour
9 1/2 ounces all-purpose flour (white whole wheat)
30 grams flax meal
1 tablespoon kosher salt
2 teaspoons sugar, omitted
4 ounces starter or poolish*
1/2 teaspoon active dry yeast
2 ounces warm water
14 1/2 ounces cold water

Directions:

1. I fear I played really loose with this recipe.  No starter for me …
I simply combined all dough ingredients together except the salt.
Mixed.
Knead for 6 minutes.
Add salt and knead for another 2 minutes or until dispersed.

2. Set aside to rise for 2 hours.
Ah, I put it in the fridge overnight …

3. Roll into a log on a flour dusted surface. Scale out dough at 3 ounces a ball (about 16 bialys total) Mine were more like 3.5 ounces.
Press each out to shape without overworking and leaving 1″ lip around edge.
Proof dough balls (allow to rise again) in warm spot covered with a clean dish towel for an hour or until soft and airy.

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4. Sauté onions in 1 tablespoon olive oil until light caramel in color but at higher heat.

Without a stove top, I caramelized my onions in a crock pot.  Works like a charm.

5. Make center depression in each one and fill with the filling.  I used a scant teaspoon of onion.

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Sprinkle bialys lightly with poppy seeds and salt.  I looked high and low but no poppy seeds here.
Bake at 450 degree oven, preferably on a pizza stone, for about 12-15 minutes.  Mine took 17 minutes.

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Bake’m Be a Buddy.  Make some bialys and share your experience and photos by emailing Judy a link to your blog or, if you don’t have a blog, email Judy a photo and a brief description.  Send to jahunt22 [at] gmail [dot] com by July 29.  Once you have posted, Judy will send you a Buddy Badge for baking along with us.  Expect a roundup of all of the BBBuddies posts a few days after the close of submissions.


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Lien’s Bran Bread ~ BBB

BBB Bran Bread ~ 100% Whole Wheat

Recipe From Lien: from the sisters Margherita and Valeria Simili

Yield: 2 loaves or 1 pullman

While this is a tricky bread to explain; it is an easy bread to enjoy.  Lien’s goal with this bread, I think, was a super healthy bread that tasted really good.  I think she succeeded exceedingly well.  There is a lot of bran in this bread and you really never really think “bran” while you’re eating it.
I believe I did a number of very small things wrong that together left me feeling this loaf missed something, missed a spark and yet we both of us kept going for another slice.  The loaf was gone in three days.  This loaf had great texture and very good crust.  I short changed on raisins and nuts, use more next time.  I very often cut down and often eliminate sugar, I think perhaps this was the spark that I missed; use some sweetening next time.

Would I make this again … I’ve got my ingredients ready to mix a starter tonight.

STARTER FOR SLOW RISE
250 grams whole wheat flour
450 grams water
75 grams wheat bran
2 pinches active dry yeast
DOUGH
110 grams whole wheat flour
150 grams whole sprouted wheat flour
20 grams rye flour
160 grams water, used water raisins soaked in

30 grams honey (omited first baking** must add next baking)
2 grams active dry yeast
30 grams butter
9 grams salt
50 grams instant skim milk powder
1 tablespoon diastatic malt flour
75 grams walnuts (next time make at least 100 grams)
75 grams raisins (next time make at least 100 grams)

Directions:

1. STARTER:  Mix white whole wheat, wheat bran and yeast with water.  Cover and let sit over night.  (Elizabeth used crushed malted rye berries also; I wish I’d had some.Next time: try some rye flour, rye flakes or malted something.)

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Starter after the overnight rise.

2. NEXT MORNING: Soak dried fruit in water.  My initial call was to use cranberries but Gorn wanted raisins (98% of the time).  I should have used at least 100 grams of either.  Another time I might use apricots.

Mix starter and all dough ingredients – holding back walnuts and dried fruit.  I used the water I soaked the raisins in – why throw away flavor?

3. KNEAD not really.  I mixed and let it sit about 20 minutes.  I added a little more flour and it still didn’t really knead.  I wasn’t willing to add more flour, in retrospect I probably should have because it never reached kneading consistency.

4. Turn the dough out on a lightly floured surface and press or roll it out flat in a big oval. Add nuts and/or raisins over the dough, fold the dough in two, press or roll out again and sprinkle on the remaining nuts/raisins. Roll the dough (jelly roll style).

5. Heavily butter pullman pan and sprinkle liberally with walnut crumbs.

6. I rolled the dough roll into my pullman pan.  Sprayed the top with water and put the pan cover on sliding it closed short of half an inch.

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7. 45 minutes later I had a really nice rise.

8. Preheat your oven to 200ºC (400ºF).
9. Make slashes in the dough (maybe if I’d added more flour).  Check the temperature of the bread (95ºC/200ºF) to be sure it is cooked.
Baked uncovered 50 minutes.  Internal temp at 201 when taken out of oven.
Take the loaves out and leave to cool completely on a wire rack.

There is no bitterness in this bread so often associated with all whole wheat breads.  I never felt like I was being made to eat this bread because it was good for me; this is easy eating bread.

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GOOD EATING.
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Do you see the big smily face upper right?  He’s telling you to get into the kitchen and Bake!
It would be great if you could join this challenge, how much bran can you add to still make good edible bread?  Get your bag of bran, knead, post and let us know how it went. And join us as a Bread Baking Buddy, send your results and what you thought of this to the Kitchen of the Month (that’s Lien this time!) type BBB Brab Bread as subject to notitievanlien(at)gmail(dot) com and you’ll be sent a Bread Baking Buddy Badge that you can add to your blogpost if you like. Deadline the 29th of June. Take on the challenge and let’s bake!


10 Comments

BBB Rolls ~ NOT Cinnamon Rolls

What can I say … They are angel light even using white whole wheat flour.  They are marvelous but then they had a fabulous breakfast filling, which included bacon.  Maybe the rest of the filling ingredients weren’t traditional breakfast fare but they were great for our breakfast yesterday and today.

The part that I don’t get is the yield/serving size.  This was my biggest mistake.  I divided by 2 and only made half the recipe.  I still got 19 rolls … ah, well, when I have guests, I’ll certainly make the full recipe and then bake a fresh batch the next two mornings.  Because I always tend to want to share, I may make the full recipe when it’s just the two of us anyway and share parts of each baking.

BBB logo april 2016

BBB Wacky Rolls and NOT Cinnamon Rolls
Babe Kitchen of the Month: Karen of BakeMyDay
Serving Size: 21
Yield: 21 rolls

480 ml [2 cups] milk
120 ml [1/2 cup] butter
30 grams brown sugar (my modification)
2 – 2.5 teaspoon yeast
520 grams [4 cups] KA white whole wheat flour
45 grams ground flax seed
65 grams [1/2 cup] AP flour (extra, reserve to add later)
1/2 teaspoon heaping baking powder
1/2 teaspoon scant baking soda
1/2 tablespoon salt
melted butter
190 gr [1 cup] sugar, I omitted

1. Oven: 375F / 190 C

2. Room temperature milk, butter, brown sugar and yeast in a bowl.
Add 4 cups of white whole wheat flour. Stir until combined, cover and let rise for 45 minutes.

3. Next, remove the cover and ADD baking powder, baking soda, salt and the remaining 1.2 cup of flour. Stir thoroughly to combine.

Oops!  I already did that in step one ~ why read when you can breeze along …

4.  Roll out the dough in a rectangle or refrigerate for at least an hour or up to 3 days. (Probably need to keep an eye out for overflowing dough, so punch down if it rises to the top). Relatively slack dough so it probably is easier to work with when chilled!
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I did chill my dough BUT the best thing I see here is:  Make all the recipe, DO NOT divide by 2.  Mix entire recipe; bake half one day and the other half a day or 2 later!  Joy in the morning!

5. Proceed as you will with any other rolls you make; roll dough into a large rectangle on a floured surface. My first batch were thicker than the second day with colder dough.  I liked both.

6. To make the filling, use your imagination… go sweet, go savoury, go wacky. Make it yours and make it good!

OK Karen:
butternut squash roasted tiny cubes
bacon chopped
apple chopped
spinach fine chopped
garlic fine chopped
walnuts, roasted and chopped

(pecans didn’t make it; I think cranberries would be marvelous; happily even though I worried I was adding too many different things, this was a great combo!)

7.  Start rolling, I always start with the long side closest to me and roll away from my body. You could do it the other way round, I am easy like that! Just keep a tight roll.

I think I roll about the same as Karen but I need to work on a slightly tighter roll.

Once you have your roll, pinch the seam and roll it once over so the seam is on the bottom. Slice into 1.1/2 inch thick slices. Cover and set aside to rise for at least 20-45 minutes before baking.  15 minutes worked for me both times.

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8. Bake fo 15-18 minutes in a preheated oven (375F/190C)
White whole wheat flour required 24 to 26 minutes.

Rolls - Not a cinnamon roll

And so we have Breakfast Rolls.  NO cinnamon, NEW tradition!

9. Make these rolls all your own.  Cook with what you like to eat and you should be able to create a lovely high and light roll you can enjoy for breakfast, lunch and dinner.  Just remember:  NO CINNAMON.

What Karen ask was why the leavening? Why not use just yeast, or only the other two?

So yes, you need to use all three in this recipe!

You will probably want to see what Elizabeth who did extensive research on the results with the three rising agents (yeast, baking powder, baking soda) had to say.  I’ll try to link to her page as soon as she posts.

My take on these rolls is all three rising agents aren’t used in Angel Rolls for nothing.  These rise like there is no tomorrow or no top to your bowl unless you use a really big bowl.  The dough is beautiful, light and supple.

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I so wanted this egg to be runny … but it stood still

10. Proof positive once again: ” Bread just wants to be bread. ”  Wisdom from Babe Elizabeth.

Notes:

The original recipe starts with heating milk/oil/sugar to just below a boil and let this cool. Karen didn’t do that and neither did I. Also, the recipe tells you to sprinkle on the yeast and let it sit for a minute to bloom. I never do that… didn’t do it this time and neither did Karen.

Basically this recipe follows the rules for making rolls, as in: make the dough, bulk rise. Roll out in a rectangle, add filling of your choice, roll up from the long side and cut into slices. Proof and bake in a moderate oven.

Now the difference lies in the leavening combo and that comes to show in the rising method.

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I do love cinnamon rolls and these would make excellent cinnamon rolls but to NOT make them cinnamon rolls presents an excellent opportunity and I definitely think you should join us on this one.

Join us as a Bread Baking Buddy.  Karen is our host this month. Bake these “Not-a-cinnamon-roll rolls” according to the recipe on Karen’s site and post it on your blog before the 30th of this month. Please make sure you mention BBB April 2016 in the subject line and link to this BBB post in your own blog post. If you don’t have a blog do not hesitate to bake and email me at bakemyday at gmail dot com with your name, a 500px wide image of your bread and the link to your BBB post. I will then send you a BBB badge for this bread that you can then add to your post on your blog. The round up can be expected around the 2nd of May.


Auberge Walnut Bread

Nuts.  Do you love nuts?  Walnuts, toasted. Do you love walnuts toasted?

Elizabeth was our lovely hostess for the March 2016 bread ~ I guess I’m a little late it now being April 7.

So, what did I change … I didn’t have to add ground flax!  I didn’t have vital wheat gluten; I did use organic bread flour (no all purpose).  I used powered ginger but there was also fresh ginger sitting on the counter and I gave that several swipes on the microplane; any ginger flavor or aroma was in the background, I didn’t really identify it.

Butter – salted or unsalted.  Before I moved to the woods, I always had both salted and unsalted on hand and used unsalted when called for.  Now, there is a place called Country Dairy   http://www.countrydairy.com/about    just 8 miles from us.  I love this place!
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You may ask what does butter (salted or unsalted) have to do with ice cream.  You can ask that.  Here’s my story, why I don’t buy salted butter anymore:  Growing up I was a lover of ice cream.  What kid isn’t!  In my world as an Air Force brat, I had ice cream from all over this country.  But for me the very best ice cream, the only ice cream worth eating was only to be found in a little mid-west town where we spent all holidays, many other times and actually lived one year while my father was stationed overseas.  My favorite aunt loved ice cream and watermelon as much as I did and so she was always willing to take me into Central Dairy for a cone.  That was childhood when I was always into ice cream.  As we struggle with waist lines in what some might call my “adulthood” (I don’t call it that even into my 70’s because it just doesn’t seem likely that I could be an adult even now.) ice cream is something for rare occasions.  Even so, I did one day find myself in Country Dairy and allowed a treat … that would be ice cream.  I don’t really remember which flavor it was but the first lick … I was suddenly 5 years old again, back on those small black and white floor tiles in Central Dairy.  People, this was ICE CREAM like it is supposed to be.  This was the real deal.

When you have that kind of a moment in a place where the people are terrific, your husband says this is the best skim milk ever, they do wonderful panini breakfast sandwiches and there is terrific cheese and sausage in the counters along with that ice cream, you can count on a VERY loyal customer – that would be me.  They only have salted butter.  Sorry, I just don’t buy unsalted butter any more.
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I brushed the mostly baked loaf with half and half.

Recipe From Elizabeth as found in Auberge of the Flowering Hearth by Roy Andries de Groot
Yield: 2 loaves

TWO LOAVES ~ Amounts
253 grams walnut halves, divided
»    200 grams 200g (2 c) whole walnut halves
»   53 grams 53g (0.66 c) walnut halves, finely chopped
420 grams (1.75 c) boiling water
34 grams (0.5c) skim milk powder
36 grams (2.5 Tbsp) unsalted butter (I used salted butter)
12 grams kosher salt (2 tsp table salt)
0.5g (0.25 tsp) powdered ginger
84 grams (4 Tbsp) dark honey
634 grams (~5 c) flour (de Groot’s recipe calls for 3c white bread and 3 c whole wheat, but that seems like too much. I switched to the equivalent of 2c white and 3c whole wheat.)
»   250 grams 250g unbleached all-purpose flour
»  9 grams 9g vital wheat gluten
»  15 grams 15g flax seed, finely ground
»   360 grams 360g whole wheat flour
29 grams (0.25 c) wheat germ
60 grams (0.25 c) water at ~98F
6 grams (2 tsp) active dry yeast
milk or cream for brushing during baking (de Groot’s recipe calls for egg yolk and milk)
HALF RECIPE ~ Amounts
ONE LOAF
170 grams walnut halves, divided
»   100 200g (2 c) whole walnut halves (I ended up using just 100g)
»   70 53g (0.66 c) walnut halves, finely chopped
210 grams (1.75 c) boiling water
17 grams (0.5c) skim milk powder
18 grams (2.5 Tbsp) unsalted butter (I used salted butter)
6 grams kosher salt (2 tsp table salt)
1/4 teaspoon 0.5g (0.25 tsp) powdered ginger, used powdered & fresh
42 grams (4 Tbsp) dark honey
267 grams (~5 c) flour (de Groot’s recipe calls for 3c white bread and 3 c whole wheat, but that seems like too much. I switched to the equivalent of 2c white and 3c whole wheat.)
»  125 grams 250g unbleached all-purpose flour
»    9 grams 9g vital wheat gluten, omitted
»    15 grams 15g flax seed, finely ground
»   185 grams 360g whole wheat flour
15 grams (0.25 c) wheat germ
30 grams (0.25 c) water at ~98F
1 teaspoon (2 tsp) active dry yeast
milk or cream for brushing during baking (de Groot’s recipe calls for egg yolk and milk)

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1. Walnuts: In the morning of the day you plan to bake the bread, spread the walnut halves in a single layer on a cookie sheet and toast them in a 400F oven for 8-10 minutes. Watch them carefully so they don’t burn! They’re done just at the moment you begin to smell them. Set aside 200g (2 c) onto a plate to cool. Using a very sharp knife, finely chop the other 53g to produce about 2/3 cup.

2. Mixing the dough: Pour just-boiled water into a large mixing bowl. Whisk in milk powder. Immediately add butter, honey, salt and powdered ginger and whisk until the butter has melted and the honey is incorporated.

3. Add flours, wheat germ and finely chopped walnuts (de Groot suggests grating them(!)) on top of one side of the large bowl.

4. Warm the water for rehydrating the yeast to around 98F, a little over body temperature. Or are you allergic to a thermometer? Heat it until it’s the temperature safe to feed to a baby: a few drops on the inside of your wrist feels warm but not hot. If it’s too hot, add cold water. (Tap water is okay, but please do NOT use water from the hot-water tap! You don’t know how long things other than water have been festering in the bottom of that tank.) Pour the warmed water into a small bowl and add the yeast. Whisk until the yeast has dissolved. Check to make sure that the milk mixture is not above body temperature (do the baby-bottle test on the inside of your wrist again) and then add the yeasted water to the milk mixture. Stir everything together with a wooden spoon to created a rough dough.

5. Kneading: Knead in the bowl (or use your electric mixer’s instructions for kneading) until the dough is smooth, “elastic and no longer sticky”.

6. Proofing: Cover the bowl with a plate and allow to proof in a draft-free area (oven with only the light turned on is ideal) until the dough has doubled.

7. Prepare the pans: Cover cookie sheets with parchment paper.

8. Walnuts and Shaping: Turn dough out onto a lightly floured board and divide in two. Roll each piece into a ball. Cover with a clean tea towel and allow to rest for 20 minutes. After their rest, flatten each ball into a disc and even divide the rest of the walnut halves on top, “pressing the nuts in slightly”, then roll each piece of dough to form a log. Joining the ends to make a ring, place each log seam side down on the parchment paper. Cover with a tea towel and allow to rise in a draft-free area until the rings have almost doubled.

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9. Baking: Preheat oven to 375F. Just before putting the bread in the oven, spray the tops liberally with water. Put the bread into the oven and immediately turn the thermostat down to 350F. After 35 minutes, brush the tops of the loaves with milk or cream (de Groot suggests using an eggyolk whisked with milk to create this glaze) and continue baking for about 10 more minutes until the loaves are nicely browned and have reached an internal temperature between 200F and 210F (the bread sounds hollow when knuckle-rapped on the bottom). Remove the bread from the oven. Don’t even think about touching that knife!!

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10. Cooling and Finishing: Allow the bread to completely cool on a footed rack before cutting into it. It’s still baking inside! Of course you may want to serve warm bread: reheat it after it has cooled completely. To reheat and/or rejuvenate Unsliced bread, turn the oven to 400F for 5 minutes or so. Turn the oven OFF. Put the bread in the hot oven for ten minutes.

You probably have already seen Elizabeth’s post and know all the fun things she put up about this bread.

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This was a delightful loaf.  Gorn requested it until it was gone … on the 2nd day.  We can really go through a loaf!
This is what we bread heads call a “keeper loaf” meaning I’ll make this one again and again.  I will say this is a keeper of the first order.  The determining factor of when that remaking may occur probably depends on when will the BBB’s run out of great keeper breads to bake.

I hope you found this bread early enough to bake it and make the Buddy list but if not, not to worry, you should still bake this one.  It is just too good to miss.

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Don’t miss out.  Bake this one.